Orinj Bouncing echo

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Orinj version 3.0.0

The Orinj Bouncing Echo is an echo in every sense of the word – the signal is repeated a number of times with an ever decreasing amplitude. It is not a simple echo, however. It differs from the simple Orinj Echo. In the simple Orinj Echo, the time between each two successive repetitions is the same (there is constant delay) and the ratio of the amplitudes of each two successive repetitions is the same (there is constant decay). The delays in the Orinj Bouncing Echo are not necessarily constant. They may change with each repetition. Thus, the Orinj Bouncing Echo is an echo with a delay sweep.

A practical example of this type of echo is a bouncing ball. Once the ball is dropped, it will bounce faster and faster as time passes, as each bounce will be of smaller and smaller height. In this example, the delays between each two successive bounces will become smaller and smaller. Since the bounce becomes quieter and quieter, we can say that this is a natural echo with an ever decreasing delay.

The delays of the Orinj Bouncing Echo are not completely random. If they were, we would have had simply a collection of simple delays the parameters of which are independent of each other, which is a tapped delay line. The delays for the successive repetitions of the Orinj Bouncing Echo are not independent of each other. There is some relationship. In our practical example of a bouncing ball, the delays may be decreasing by the same amount or the same ratio.

Using the Orinj Bouncing Echo

You can add the Orinj Bouncing Echo to tracks in the multitrack session view , tracks in the loop building view, and to waves in the single wave view. In the multitrack session view and in the loop building view, first select the track to which you want to add the effect. In all these views, click on Effect, Delay, and then on Orinj Bouncing Echo in the Orinj menu. You will see the following dialog with two tabs.

The Orinj Bouncing Echo dialog – delay tab

The Orinj Bouncing Echo dialog – decay tab

When this dialog becomes visible, the Orinj Bouncing Echo effect has been added. Adjust the parameters of the bouncing echo in the dialog above and click Close. These parameters are described below.

Orinj Bouncing Echo parameters

See Orinj Effects for an explanation of the Title, Track, Presets, and Bypass controls. The remaining Orinj Bouncing Echo controls are described below:

  • Delay graph: This graph shows the delay for each repetition. In the graph in the dialog above, for example, the delay decreases between the original signal and the 15th repetition from 500 milliseconds (ms) to zero milliseconds. The first 15 repetitions then are an example of an echo that resembles a bouncing ball. The repetitions come faster and faster one after the other. You can use the graph to add additional points and to move points up and down and left and right. To add a point, click anywhere on the graph where you would like the point to appear. To move a point, click on that point and drag it. All points in the graph are shown as small yellow squares, except the selected point. The selected point is in white. The selected point can also be moved or removed with the remaining controls of the dialog. (Note that if this graph has points that are vertically aligned and the lines between them are horizontal, then the delays between repetitions are constant and the echo becomes a standard echo).
  • Repetition: Use these controls – the box and the slider – to set at which repetition the selected point should be placed. The selected point is the one that is in white in the top graph. Each point can be placed at any repetition from 1 to 49. The two end points (the first one and the last one) cannot be moved left or right. In the dialog above, for example, the selected point is the first one and cannot be moved. It must remain at repetition 0. Thus, the repetition controls are disabled. If you click on a different point to select it (e.g., the point at repetition 15 above), these controls will become enabled. As you change these controls, the selected point in the top graph will move to the left or to the right.
  • Delay: Use these controls – the box and the slider – to set the delay of the selected point in the top graph. As before, the selected point is shown in white. As these controls change, the selected point will move up or down to show a larger or a smaller delay respectively. The delay at any point, at any of the repetitions from 0 to 50, can be changed when this point is selected. The delay for a specific point is the difference in time between the repetition at that point and the previous repetition. (At repetition 0, we will obviously be describing the delay of the original signal, which has no practical meaning. However, although the original signal has no delay, a point at the original signal – at repetition 0 – defines the delays between itself and the next point in the graph. In the dialog above for example, the fact that the delay at repetition 0 is 500 ms defines the line between that delay and the delay at repetition 15 and, hence, defines the delays of each of the repetitions between the original signal and repetition 15.) The delay is measured in milliseconds and can be between 0 ms and 1000 ms (1 second).
  • Remove: Use this button to remove the selected point in the top graph. The first and last point of the echo cannot be removed. The selected point is the one that shows in white. When this point is removed, nothing else in the echo will change. A new line will be drawn in the top graph between the points to the left and right of the removed point.
  • Remove All: Use this button to remove all points in the top graph except for the two end points.
  • Max repetitions: Use this control to set the maximum number of repetitions that the echo should have. Although, with some decay, the repetitions of the echo will be of ever decreasing amplitude and, since Ornj works with wave PCM data, will eventually become of zero amplitude, you may want to cut off the echo early. You can do so with this control. The maximum repetitions can be between 1 and 50.
  • Decay graph: This graph shows the impulse response of the echo. That is, it is a simple graphical representation of the repetitions of the echo. In the example above, the bottom graph shows 15 repetitions with ever decreasing amplitude and with an ever decreasing distance between them (decreasing delay). This graph is there to show you the echo and cannot be used to modify the echo.
  • Decay: Use these controls – the box and the slider – to set the decay of the echo. The decay of the bouncing echo is constant, similarly to the decay of the simple Orinj Echo. The ratio of the amplitude of the first repetition to the amplitude of original signal and the ratio of the amplitude of each other repetition to the amplitude of the previous repetitions are the same and are shown in these controls. The decay is measured in percent and can be between 0% (complete decay, zero repetition amplitude) and 100% (no decay, each repetition is of the same amplitude as the original signal).

See Orinj Effects for additional notes on: where Orinj effects can be used, using boxes and sliders that control the same effect parameter, applying effects to mono and stereo waves, and using effects during playback. See Orinj Working with effects for additional information on creating, modifying, moving, removing, and processing effects. See Delay effect for additional information on the different types of delay effects in audio processing.

Dry and wet mix

The Orinj Bouncing Echo supports dry and wet mix changes. That is, you can adjust the mix between the original signal and the echo. See Orinj Effects for more information.

The Orinj version 2 Bouncing Echo

The Orinj version 2 Bouncing Echo dialog

The parameters of the Orinj version 2 Bouncing Echo are the same. A difference in version 2 is that all parameters are displayed in a single tab in the dialog.



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